Ciara-catures and Ayesha Curry Unicorns: Are you Steph enough?

I was listening to a podcast recently— The Africanist. It was a really good episode about spirituality. At the end of each episode, the all male panel have a very interesting segment called “Respect or Nah” where they decide whether or not a current event is worthy of their respect… or nah. In this case, the event was Russell Wilson’s engagement to Ciara and the hosts were debating whether or not they respected Russell’s decision to wife Ciara. I winced numerous times during the conversation, but what really killed me was the way in which Ayesha Curry was put up against Ciara in this epic battle of ‘worthiness of marriage’. *Sigh* 

So here’s what Ciara’s caricature looks like:

  • Man eating whore with a child, thereby proving her whoredom…
  • Sleeps with rappers
  • Other things whores do, because she has a child out of wed lock so she is one— a whore that is (…pure logic)


Here’s what Ayesha Curry’s caricature looks

  • Christian
  • Modest
  • All around good girl
  • And she’s “bad”
  • Mother, wife, cheerleader, supporter, comforter, friend
  • Not. a. whore.




After they had built these two caricatures, a majority, if not all, of the members of the podcast agreed that they all wanted— NAY — deserved an Ayesha Curry. LOL! Imagine!

So I first had to ask them (as I was driving and speaking with a slightly elevated voice at my iPhone): Are you Stephan Curry?!?!

In case you are confused by the question, here’s how to know if you are:

      • En route to becoming/ currently are a millionaire before your 30th birthday?
      • Attended Christian youth group meetings in high school?
      • Willing to be with one girl during your college years (at a time when you could have literally had every single girl in the world)?
      • Willing to marry *that* same girl at a time when you are en route to becoming a legend in whatever your field of human endeavor?
      • Confident in yourself and your life trajectory by the age of 23?
      • Working tirelessly at your giftings and craft?
      • Generally indifferent about the need to consistently get a shape up for public appearances?

It is VERY likely that of the aforementioned criteria, you maaaaaaybe fit half  a third one of them… And that is the one about your hair line (because we are all doing the whole Wknd, beard gang, no shape up life these days, so yeah…)  And so how horrible would I be to say that because you don’t fit the standards listed above, you should never be able to wife an Ayesha (whatever that even means…)? But that’s what people have done to Ciara. So maybe Future was a bad partner… And unfortunately she did have his child, but should she not get to be with an “alleged” good guy like Russell Wilson because of that? Because the truth of the matter is, that if I am employing the same logic to the guys on the podcast (and those that share their same sentiments), I am almost 300% certain that you all are or were in fact a Ciara-cature (as we shall call it from this point forward), so how come you deserve an ‘Ayesha’?

unnamed (1)This then leads me to my next question: Weren’t you a Ciara-cature all through your 20’s? *Pause and reflect*. Some time back, Afua wrote a post about being the girl who comes right before a guy has his ‘come to Jesus’ moment. It’s this idea that guys can go out into the world and demolish hearts and minds and souls and bodies— and then rise from the ashes they have created and ‘rightfully’ marry a Michelle Obama of their choosing. The issue is that men don’t have to carry the physical manifestations of a one night stand gone wrong (aka pregnancy). And some can even have children and be so distant from them that it’s as if they do not have them at all. In essence, a guy’s sexual history isn’t necessarily on display if they don’t have the children to show for it.

Real Queen of Dragons

I hate the Ciara-cature that has been created, because after all, anyone could get pregnant when having sex. And everyone has a relationship with characters they are ashamed of. But unlike the Reggie Bush’s, Ray J’s and Chris Humphries of the world, they can move on in their lives from those shameful exes. Just because Ciara was impregnated by her shameful past of a boyfriend in a public setting doesn’t make her any different from many young people just ‘relationshipping’ today (minus the million dollar ring and private island vacations and all). In fact, in the most recent issue of Essence magazine, Ciara had some really interesting things to say about her past and her commitment to her faith and moving on from her mistakes. If nothing else, she has learned not to lower her standard and to focus on herself and child. Who wouldn’t want to be with someone who is resilient and focused and a better person because of the choices they’ve made. Isn’t that the height of maturity?!

Ride or Die goals… or nah?

So then men people will say, well what I love about Ayesha is how ride- or- die she is. And it’s not really just about her modesty, but it’s about the fact that she stans for her man. *four. drawn. out. slow. claps* WOW. Have you not met your mother? Or your aunties? Or cousins? Living on the continent where polyamory is still very much the order of the day? How much did our mothers have to put up with in the way of disrespect? And they stuck it through… Some even managed to make it through the mid life crisis periods where their husbands had not one, but two small girl(friend)s. How much more loyal does that get? People idolize Ayesha’s commitment and fangirling of her husband as if she’s the first and best to ever do it. Thing is, it’s undeniably clear that if Steph wasn’t who he was, she probably couldn’t be to him what she is [if in doubt about what that is, revisit the ‘Are you Steph Curry’ questions above]. It’s interesting because I find that when guys speak of the “ride- or- die chick” here, they mean someone who will allow them to do be… Whoever they want all the time with little care for your feelings and expectations. How does this even compare? And so the question here is– why should I ride or die for you? Because if you are the Future to my Ciara-cature then how is that even fair? And people think Future’s cheating and lying and general uselessness is the only way to be a Future-cature (too much? I know lol!). But it’s also about your (lack of) sense of self, drive and ambitions, dedication to building a strong family— where are these sensibilities?



So let’s say you have asked yourself all of these questions, and you think— I am still a decent guy, so I deserve an Ayesha. My last and final question is a nod to the following point: many of the guys making these comments would have preferred a Ciara-cature in their prime than an Ayesha. So then I have to ask: Would you have dated an Ayesha at the time that Steph dated her? Cuz there were MAD 19 year old Ayeshas with braces and Bibles in college that you turned out or turned down. Remember?? *Pause and reflect.*

IMG_6810 (1)

Oh aight.

Here’s the thing.  

I like Ayesha Curry.

She’s made it cool to be this super corny cute chick that values modesty and a good lip sync moment. She’s committed to her values and she loves her family. She’s taken a stand and she’s unashamed. That being said, Ayesha Curry’s exist en masse… like pressed down, shaken together, running over abundance! But. What. The. World. Needs. More. Of. Are. The. Stephs.

So if you are a man out in the world and believe you ‘deserve’ an Ayesha Curry, consider your role in your current Ayesha-less reality… and leave the Ciara-catures out of your analysis. Because what everyone deserves is to be with someone who is trying to be the best version of themselves… and that could look like Ciara or Ayesha— if you’re a Russell or Steph, that is.  

What are your thoughts? Sound off below!

Maybe it’s time to get my swirl on

As we get older and (hopefully) become more self aware, we start questioning some belief systems that we’ve held on to for seemingly no reason. And this can’t be more true than my feelings for white men, well let me say ‘non-black’ men.

.             .            .

Like it is in many aspects of my life, when it rains, it generally pours, and the idea of being open to non-black men has been pouring down like Accra torrential rains.

Comments far and wide:

Sometimes Afua you have to just choose happiness, even if it comes in a different package pigment.

Sometimes you can’t wait for the black man to get their act together, there’s too few of them to choose from.” See interesting clip from the show Being Mary Jane on why even the ‘good’ brothers can be problematic. But I digress, let’s keep going…

“For what you’re looking for, you’re probably going to have to cast your net wider, and by wider I mean… Non-Ghanaian, scratch that, non-African, scratch that, I mean non-black.”

…hmmm that’s awkward.

So you don’t think I can get my ‘unassuming thoughtful gentleman, progressive in thought about gender roles in the house, Jesus-loving, Bawse in the board room but isn’t afraid to let me shine and is supportive’ man in the same pigment as I?

*Long Deep Sigh*

.             .            .

If we take a little trip down memory lane,  pre-college era, I was all about non-black men. Blame it on my surroundings (much of that time was spent growing up in Canada… eh), but there just weren’t many black men period. Think about having five black kids in my school at one point, two being me and my sistren sigh. Now add in having a connection to them. So to say it was slim pickings would be the understatement of the century. Moving to the US in the middle of high school and then going to college in the US opened my eyes to a whole new world: Black men ‘like me’! As in coming from a similar background… Whether African or not, they had similar family values and educational consciousness. Eureka, I had struck gold! However, as time has gone by I’m realizing this pool of men are still… Just. Men. And that ‘gold’ still needs refining.

Even moving to the continent now. One would think I would have struck even more gold, particularly among the returnee crowd, but Lord only knows what’s been our My Experience. So the million dollar question becomes ‘what happens if what you’re looking for ISN’T looking for you?’ Whether it’s because they’re already married, they don’t actually exist, or are attracted to a different type of woman (white women, less career-oriented women, more traditional women, younger women? [slot in any and everything else I’m not]). Welt, if you’re not the person the person you’re looking for is looking for then perhaps it could be time to change what you’re looking for *shrug*. And I think we singles have heard this general piece of advice several times over (particularly as we inch closer and closer to 30). However, I think we’ve always assumed this means scaling down on the character asks, and not changing the color of a person’s outside shell.

.             .            .

I love black men. And if y’all have any doubts from my posts, let me say it again: I. Love. Black. Men. I don’t think there’s anything more sexy than a strong black man taking care of his business, loving his family and serving his God. However, if *that* man isn’t checking for me, maybe it’s time I switch out the packaging and maybe get my swirl on! eyes-emoji cheese

Now there are so many considerations while making this sort of declaration (publicly).
Image result for swirl interracial dating

First off: I must admit I do not even know the first thing about being with a white man Raise-Your-Hand. Yes yes, I’ve had this conversation with a few ppl in the last few weeks, and the first response is ‘duh men are men, it’s the same as being with a black man’, but hold up one minute. Hold on. It’s NOT the same. Can me and a white guy talk about the same stuff, freely? Listen to the same things, go the same places… freely? Hmmm, honestly speaking I don’t even know anything about the initial step: how do you flirt with a white man? And I know y’all are laughing (or completely side-eying me), but I’m dead serious. How do I know if a white man is flirting with me?!? *eyes look left, eyes look right* I mean I’ve met white guys that I found attractive inside and out, but I never really knew what they thought of me. It’s more so because every positive vibe I get from a non-black man is cataloged as friends-vibe. Maybe it’s because my eyes aren’t even open to the possibility that a white man would be checking for me mixed with a combination of me not putting out (non-verbal) vibes that I’m into white men.

And this is all just real talk, RR.

Some other serious considerations include: ‘How do I know it’s not a weird black girl fetish thing that’s going on?’ point Remember, I live in Africa and the pool from which you’re working with in terms of white men generally goes as follows: “the short term contractor; the short term or (sometimes weird) long term development type- who lives a transient lifestyle…” Overall there’s a general ‘passing through’ or I’m a little-off vibe I get with them here. You don’t just get your regular ol’ guy living and working in Africa, but I just happen to be white- vibe. no offense.

Another consideration is family and culture. And I’m not talking about mine, because Praise the Almighty on High that I have a progressive family who even for the majority of my life thought I would end up with a white boy. They don’t see any issue with marrying outside of ones race. However, it’s the general culture here that poses issues. One, when you see a mixed race couple in these parts, with the woman being black, it’s a certain type of relationship… Of more the transactional nature than true ”mutual’ love. Secondly, I’m outsider. And I’ve been fighting it forever ‘me y3 ghanaiani!’*, but I’ve now come to terms with it that I. am. culturally. an. outsider. Even though my name is Afua, my default thought process is not that of a typical Ghanaian. As such, I’ve desired to marry someone who isn’t a complete outsider like me. It’s stupid and probably childish, but I’m just being real…. Sue me.

I’m not sure if y’all watched the Being Mary Jane season 3 finale [Spoiler Alert Ahead]. However, when she breaks up with her white boyfriend, she says the ultra real words of: “I don’t want to have to explain everything to you.” And that is so real. And for me we’re not just talking about ‘black issues’, we’re talking of the African/Ghanaian ones too. I remember a few Christmases ago we were at a family friend’s place and their daughter, a woman with a very similar profile to me, had brought home her white husband. Cool. He was chill. We had no issues with him as he tried his best to welcome all aspects of our Ghanaian culture. But I distinctly remember a conversation everyone was having in the living room one day and I remember every few seconds she having to whisper some subtle explanation of what was going on. It’s whenever I think about that, that I’m just like…

… I… Just…

…  …  ….  I…  … Just


Chale… Me sef**… Half the time I’M the outsider needing explaining of why this is rude in Ghana; why we have to do this as protocol, even though it makes no God awful sense; why respect and traditionalism is more important than efficiency or doing the most logical thing… #butthatsnoneofmybusiness …
So to now come bring you an outsider into my plight. …I …Just… can’t… *deep sigh*
I mean is it wrong to want to be with someone who doesn’t need explaining along with me?

I think I’ll stop things here for now. I want to know if y’all have any thoughts for me, RR. Do you agree with anything I’ve said, or do you have advice on how all my insignificant items of concern are probably holding back my entire quest for true love? Or perhaps you want to tell me that I should move to Europe, which apparently is the new mecca for black girls wanting good white men… and I’m not joking, see here, here, and here.

*Translation of twi phrase: I’m Ghanaian

**Translation of pigeon phrase: Me myself

That moment you realize you’re down with the swirl- I love this clip from Facebook.